The Story of the Good Ship ‘Lollipop’

So last week I was camping. It was pretty cool. We drove to a lake. It was several hours from Saskatoon, so by the time I picked up the package from the airport and drove north it was about 2 am when we rolled into the campsite. I had never been there before so it was a whole new experience.

The ride up was kind of nice. We were on provincial back roads. Almost no traffic at all at that time of night. We caught glimpses of northern lights – a green curtain of misty fog that dances slowly in the sky. It was also almost permanent twilight with the summer solstice just the day before. It never gets completely dark at this latitude and time of year, its as if the sun has gone down and won’t go away completely. It’s quite nice.

At the lake we did some crazy shit. Found a private dock thing to lay out in the sun. On the way back to the main camp area we traversed the lake ‘shore’ but it became a bit of a battle of sticks and wire and other obstacles because the lake water level was very high. I had found a paddle on the lake shore earlier in the day, and I scored another one up in the tangle of branches on the obstacle course getting back.

The good ship lollipop – she was a bit of a wreck. Half submerged and covered in sand and other lake debris. It looked like a hopeless case. Like us really. We tipped the crap out of it and bailed a bunch of water out. There were leaches in there and we had to scrape a shitload of what looked like fish eggs off the inside.

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She was in poor shape when we found her, with no captain or crew.

 

Once we got that done we realised, we had righted the ship, and she appeared seaworthy! We came back loaded up with towels and bags, and snacks and sunscreen. I was wearing my black man thong, because really, there’s no need to overdress for something like this. We took off and did a sort of oar paddle and peddle (because she is a paddle boat with peddles).  It was fairly efficient but she was lacking seats so my arse slid back a lot and sometimes she went in circles.

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But it did provide a fairly stable and even relaxing floating platform on which we could enjoy the lake!

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Lets go sailing!

 

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Out on the lake late at night it was so still, so serene.

 

 

Most Epic Campsite – Ever.

Hey Bloggers, here are some photos from my camping trip last week. We were looking for somewhere to pitch a tent. Wasn’t too fussy – could have been in an open field, a rail siding, or whatever. The main criteria was that it was to be away from anywhere people would come by, and cost nothing.

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So we found a spot. Its part of a village museum. Technically not supposed to camp there but, whatever. There was no one else around, except for a farmhouse on the other side of the grid road. We drove for about 20 km up a grid road off a lonely stretch of provincial highway to get to this spot. It was really out of the way.

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We debated for a while where the tent should be set up, I wanted tucked in behind the church, we settled on a spot in a kind of depression in the lawn bbq area. It was really nice. We even got a fire going and cooked some dinner.

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I got some great photos of the old church and graveyard as the sun was going down and again in the early morning as the sun rose. It was the most epic camping spot, because we took a gamble and broke a few rules! 

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“Here comes the sun, little darling…. “
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This is the basic travel/camp kit. You really don’t need any more than this, really!

 

An old barn in Saskatchewan, a photo essay….

Driving on the highway today, we noticed an old barn in a farmer’s field. The crop is new, and we were able to step between the seedlings of soy to work our way across the field to access the old barn. I was kind of tentative, because this was a farmers field, and I didn’t want to be disrespectful or trespass, but it was an awesome looking structure in the middle of a crop field with no other buildings around it.

 

 

I’m not sure what type of architecture or construction you would call this. I’m tempted to think that this might have been built by Hutterites, but that would be flagrant speculation on my part. I estimate that the structure was probably 100 years old or so. It might have been for livestock because the internals had some segregation that was hinting at stalls or something.

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Inside was amazing. Looking up into to the internals of the roof structure it was absolutely beautiful. The roof lining had rotted off in many places and the sunlight was filtering through in a very nice display of filtered light. You could really appreciate the craft work that had been put into the construction.

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Grain Elevators, Saskatchewan, a photo essay….

Hi Bloggers,

I have been out of town camping for a few days. We have been to some nice locations. The bugs are out in force, and there is a lot of standing water. I have no doubt that Saskatchewan is most likely the mosquito capital of the world. At some spots we have been literally swarmed by the little bastards.

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Canwood, Saskatchewan. Never heard of it….

As we are driving around, I am always looking out for these majestic structures that stand proud on the flat prairie that surrounds them. They serve as beacons in the fields. There is some real history here. These old wooden structures have been around a very long time. These days the modern era has ushered in bulk grain storage in concrete silos that are very impressive, but really lack the aesthetic beauty of their predecessors.

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Old. Iconic. Prairie sentinels..

They are almost always labelled with the name of the town in big capital letters on the side. These structures are located by a rail line. Depending on the location there may be one, two or more of these elevators in a row, and sometimes you see the different eras being represented in one site, perhaps timber, iron and concrete.

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Its hard not to feel a sense of romantic nostalgia with these buildings. It makes me imagine the times the district has seen. Normally, they are located in each town, so there is a lot of them. Before bulk storage and bulk transport and bulk everything else, the local farmer would perhaps transport their grain to these elevators to be railed to the market, where ever that might be. A group of farmers would likely form a co-op and perhaps even fund one of these facilities to service the district.

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Some of them are in good condition – especially those lined with sheet galvanized steel, but some of the old timber ones are really starting to deteriorate.

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We came by one that just begged to be explored. The town was small and quiet. There was no one around to tell us not to explore. I sided around the building and walked along the rail line to access the back of the elevator. There was a service platform with a rickety old ladder attached to it. I hoisted my weight onto the rotten boards and gingerly crept along the edge. I tried the sliding timber doors, and viola, they opened!

Inside I could make out a room with a number of handles – to control the chutes I suppose. There were side openings and timber chutes etc. Birds had taken over the interior and droppings were everywhere. There was a mildy dusty and musky smell. I continued into the building and was able to walk around inside and even access an upper level via a set of internal stairs. Out of the weather, this old elevator was in really great shape.

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Hoey, Saskatchewan. Never heard of it…

We found another one, perhaps a bit more modern, but all the same beautiful. We could see it from the nearby highway and it drew us in, following a turn off and some back roads to get right up close. When we were there we took a bunch of photos and messed around on the rail wagons. Simple, country fun!

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Every grain elevator has the province and town name on it. Its as if they do this so maybe if a farmer comes by and snaps out of a daydream saying ‘where the fek am I? Oh, right, good old Saskatchewan’…
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No apparent reason for this kind of behaviour!

1000 likes. That’s pretty cool! I’m having fun with this!!!!!!!!!!!

WP community, this little gem popped up in my notifications today. I know this is probably humble beginnings, but it gives me hope. I spend lots of time and effort on my blogs, and its nice to know that there are people out there who appreciate my quirky view of the world enough to stop by and like what I’m doing.

Thank you. So I took a picture of the flower in my garden to share with you all. Peace, hugs, Namaste.

 

Congratulations on getting 1,000 total likes on The Random Blog of Irreverent Thoughts.
Your current tally is 1,001.

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Hart Lake, BC. A simply beautiful place….

Hart Lake, BC, is on Hwy 97 between Prince George and McLeod Lake – or south of Chetwynd.

Its simply one of the most beautiful places that I’ve visited. Its in the pine pass – a section of highway that runs right through the Rocky Mountains. Its relatively remote, wild, and gorgeous. The mountains that surround it are absolutely epic.

There is a camp ground there if you want to pitch a tent or bring in a trailer.

It’s kind of tucked away, and in a very windy part of the highway, so its easy to miss. Once I found it, I could hardly go past without stopping in. Its very clear, and its very cold. I have run off the end of the floating dock (naked of course) for a quick dip.

Here’s a link to a map for the geography nuts:

https://www.google.ca/maps/place/Hart+Lake/@54.1013772,-124.080653,8z/data=!4m5!3m4!1s0x538f2cc22640cbc7:0xed35d1b99a295e36!8m2!3d54.4679635!4d-122.6512378

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This is my daughter, when she was about 3 years old.